willnobilis:

cumaeansibyl:

missvoltairine:

gement:

ineffably-crowley:

sparkafterdark:

glumshoe:

sparkafterdark:

tenaflyviper:

He is, however, perfectly willing to fuck with time and reality.
And also steal your infants.

He didn’t steal anything. She literally asked him to take the baby. Don’t make him the bad guy just because she was a shitty sister.

I think you are severely misinformed as to how baby ownership works.
It was not her baby to give.
David Bowie is unquestionably the villain.

Which do you think existed first, modern custody legislature, or the goblin king? 
The girl was entrusted by her parents with the care and custody of the child. By the laws governing the goblin king and his transactions, the girl was the current rightful owner of the child and made a deal with the king to take the child. Perhaps you’re not familiar with english folklore. Fae have rules, they’re tricksters, they can be sneaky, but they never break the rules.

Slammin’ it down in the Labyrinth fandom tonight, kids.

Children, children. Yes, he was playing by the rules, and yes, he gets to be the villain. In lit crit, you get to have your cake and eat it too!
And then run away from it when it turns into a whirling tunnel cleaner death machine.
That analogy got away from me a bit. And is now chasing me down a hallway brb

OH MY GOD are people really getting buttmad about calling David Bowie in Labrynth the villain
sure, she asked him to take the baby, but she clearly didn’t know that fairies were like, a real thing? and he could have just NOT TAKEN THE BABY, he could have done that. Christ. “Abloobloobloo fae have laws” what a nerd. He’s the villain. It’s a MOVIE. IT’S A KIDS MOVIE. HE’S THE VILLAIN. 

We have laws too! And this is clearly an unconscionable contract because Sarah is a) probably a minor and b) completely unaware that she is actually entering into a contract! You can’t actually make a contract with someone when you have reasonable grounds to believe that they don’t exist.
Who was it I was talking with a while back about fae lawyers? I’m pretty sure any fae lawyer worth their salt could get judgment for the plaintiff in the Unseelie Supreme Court.
I understand that this is contrary to the spirit of missv’s entirely valid “it’s a kids’ movie you nerds” point, but I’m not averse to fighting nerd with nerd.

Point A is correct.  She is 15 at the time of the events that happened.
However, point B?  It can be safe to assume that while she was not sure Jareth existed, she knew of his existence.
" A pan of Sarah’s room at the start of the film shows that she has a number of children’s books on her shelves, including The Wizard Of Oz, Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland and Maurice Sendak’s Outside Over There. The reading material shown in Sarah’s room indicates that she has a love of fairy-tales and fantasy, a trait that is also suggested by the fact she is first seen rehearsing a play in pseudo-medieval costume."
"Prior to encountering Jareth directly, Sarah knows him solely as a character in the play The Labyrinth. When she first comes face to face with him, she is terrified and begs him to return her brother…"
So with the above in mind, she has a clue about how contracts with fae beings work, if only from having read about them extensively.
Citations here

I found a place where people take Jim Henson movies more seriously than I do.
Tumblr is a wonderful, terrifying place.

willnobilis:

cumaeansibyl:

missvoltairine:

gement:

ineffably-crowley:

sparkafterdark:

glumshoe:

sparkafterdark:

tenaflyviper:

He is, however, perfectly willing to fuck with time and reality.

And also steal your infants.

He didn’t steal anything. She literally asked him to take the baby. Don’t make him the bad guy just because she was a shitty sister.

I think you are severely misinformed as to how baby ownership works.

It was not her baby to give.

David Bowie is unquestionably the villain.

Which do you think existed first, modern custody legislature, or the goblin king? 

The girl was entrusted by her parents with the care and custody of the child. By the laws governing the goblin king and his transactions, the girl was the current rightful owner of the child and made a deal with the king to take the child. Perhaps you’re not familiar with english folklore. Fae have rules, they’re tricksters, they can be sneaky, but they never break the rules.

Slammin’ it down in the Labyrinth fandom tonight, kids.

Children, children. Yes, he was playing by the rules, and yes, he gets to be the villain. In lit crit, you get to have your cake and eat it too!

And then run away from it when it turns into a whirling tunnel cleaner death machine.

That analogy got away from me a bit. And is now chasing me down a hallway brb

OH MY GOD are people really getting buttmad about calling David Bowie in Labrynth the villain

sure, she asked him to take the baby, but she clearly didn’t know that fairies were like, a real thing? and he could have just NOT TAKEN THE BABY, he could have done that. Christ. “Abloobloobloo fae have laws” what a nerd. He’s the villain. It’s a MOVIE. IT’S A KIDS MOVIE. HE’S THE VILLAIN. 

We have laws too! And this is clearly an unconscionable contract because Sarah is a) probably a minor and b) completely unaware that she is actually entering into a contract! You can’t actually make a contract with someone when you have reasonable grounds to believe that they don’t exist.

Who was it I was talking with a while back about fae lawyers? I’m pretty sure any fae lawyer worth their salt could get judgment for the plaintiff in the Unseelie Supreme Court.

I understand that this is contrary to the spirit of missv’s entirely valid “it’s a kids’ movie you nerds” point, but I’m not averse to fighting nerd with nerd.

Point A is correct.  She is 15 at the time of the events that happened.

However, point B?  It can be safe to assume that while she was not sure Jareth existed, she knew of his existence.

" A pan of Sarah’s room at the start of the film shows that she has a number of children’s books on her shelves, including The Wizard Of Oz, Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland and Maurice Sendak’s Outside Over There. The reading material shown in Sarah’s room indicates that she has a love of fairy-tales and fantasy, a trait that is also suggested by the fact she is first seen rehearsing a play in pseudo-medieval costume."

"Prior to encountering Jareth directly, Sarah knows him solely as a character in the play The Labyrinth. When she first comes face to face with him, she is terrified and begs him to return her brother…"

So with the above in mind, she has a clue about how contracts with fae beings work, if only from having read about them extensively.

Citations here

I found a place where people take Jim Henson movies more seriously than I do.

Tumblr is a wonderful, terrifying place.

(Source: )

Oddly enough, even with all of my love for the muppets, I never got the soundtrack to their first movie, "The Muppet Movie." That was thankfully rectified this year.  I also received “Jim Henson: A Biography.”

What do you DO in a small town?

lawfulgoodness:

lawfulgoodness:

lawfulgoodness:

lawfulgoodness:

So this post got me thinking of how many times I’ve heard the question “So what is there to do in a small town?” This usually comes from folks who are either from the same area I live now (one of the USA’s 10…

  • went to the gym
  • watched some Ghost in the Shell: Stand-alone complex
  • worked on dossier design
  • ate lunch
  • visited a friend who is in the hospital
  • went star gazing / astrophotography
  • started reading “Jim Henson: The Biography” which I got for Christmas
  • while listening to “The Muppet Movie Soundtrack” which I got for Christmas
  • no I’m an adult, I swear

I’m not sure who besides me would stay up until 10:30 pm on Christmas Eve to watch a nativity program helmed by a Henson and listen to church music, but I’m really excited about “A New York Christmas to Remember” tonight.

(Source: youtube.com)

"LOST" DARK CRYSTAL DIRECTOR’S CUT ON YOUTUBE

bogleech:


Apparently, this guy tracked down a completely unreleased, black and white director’s cut of the Dark Crystal, then spent the past two years synching its audio up with the theatrical cut and splicing in the missing scenes.

This is the version Jim Henson originally submitted, it has never been available to the public until this very month. It is darker, subtler and has significantly less dialog, with no narration, no internal monologues, very little exposition and some entirely different voices, including a completely inhuman, intentionally untranslated language for the majority of Skeksis dialog. We were never meant to understand most of what they were saying.

The version we’re all more familiar with was subjected to a great deal of last-minute re-dubbing, specifically to make it lighter and more child-friendly.This is The DARK Dark Crystal.