All manner of scifi/fantasy/nerdness: RPGs, comic books, Firefly, RPGs, Community, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, RPGs, Avengers, Doctor Who, And RPGs. And comic books. And RPGS. Not a "fandom" blog, unless D&D alignments count as a fandom.

 

voodooish:

shadowgentleman:

Being part of a fandom but not really caring about the show anymore

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Being into a show where it’s fandom has already died off.

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 #’HEY WALLY WEST IS DEAD ASKS

…why….. why would you do that?

/sniff  :’(

DC Comics Challenge - Day 25: Favorite Relationship (Romantic)

Wally West & Linda Park-West

I always wanted to see more of them in Justice League/JLU but they only hinted at the possibility of a relationship.

They were never depicted as having it all “figured out.”

They were fumbling through their relationship, sometimes making good choices

Sometimes making bad decisions

but always ending up together

I miss these two so much.

raybucho:

okay, so what happens DIRECTLY before this bit of dialogue needs needs NEEDS to be talked about.

This entire episode is all about Batman and Orion shitting all over how The Flash does things and how flippant and aloof he is and so they all go to his city to try to stop some of his criminals from trying to kill the flash.

And when Flash finds this villain in the bar Batman and Orion both try to beat the info out of him and flash calls them off and sits right down next to him and just asks if he’s gone off his meds and lets him vent about what’s going on in his life.  And at the end he tells the Flash that he’ll start taking his medicine again and where the rest of the villains are that are trying to kill him.  ONLY THEN does Flash tell him to hand himself in.

once Flash is assured that he’s okay and not going to hurt anyone else.  it flies in the face of Batman’s fear and Orion’s brutality, it throws both of their brutal real-world techniques out of the water… because the Flash just wants people to be happy and safe, not to strike fear or defeat foes.

and that makes him pretty amazing

(Source: emmafrosticle)

dccomicconfessions:

"I may be beating a dead horse but I miss Wally. The reason for this is because he was one of the most evolved characters. We grew with him. We met him as a kid who became Kid Flash. He learned from Barry and took his place when he died. He was a womanizer who met Linda and married her. He even became a father to twins! There were so many human moments with Wally and his life that it made the comic so real and absorbing. We experienced joy, sorrow, victories, and losses with him. Long live Wally."

I miss character growth.

dccomicconfessions:

"I may be beating a dead horse but I miss Wally. The reason for this is because he was one of the most evolved characters. We grew with him. We met him as a kid who became Kid Flash. He learned from Barry and took his place when he died. He was a womanizer who met Linda and married her. He even became a father to twins! There were so many human moments with Wally and his life that it made the comic so real and absorbing. We experienced joy, sorrow, victories, and losses with him. Long live Wally."

I miss character growth.

"But there comes a time when you’ve got to stop running away from things, and you’ve got to start running towards something.

You’re got to forge ahead.

Even if your path isn’t lit, trust that you’ll find your way.”

A Question, Please

gailsimone:

I’m curious about something.

How many of you came to the DC or Marvel universes initially through either the films, or animated series?

Did you fall in love with superheroes through comics, or was your first real exposure to them from other media?

And finally, specifically, does your love for a certain character or team stem in any way from film or animation, by which I mean, are you a Batman or X-men fan, for example, at least partially due to the films or cartoons?

This is for a reason…thanks!

Growing up in the ’80s, my parents felt that comic books had gotten too dark and gritty, not appropriate for a young reader.  My grandparents would give me older comic books here and there that were “approved” by my parents, but they were mostly non-Superhero books (Richie Rich, etc), or if I got a superhero comic it was only an issue here or there, no complete story lines and not enough to really “get into” comic books.

Then

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