ollieplaysdnd:

zann-ward:

Valid reasons to not allow me to play as a certain race:

  • too powerful
  • not powerful enough
  • extinct/there are only like seven of them

Invalid reasons to not allow me to play as a certain race:

  • not one of the “major” races
  • they are the “bad guys”
  • they are weird/silly looking

This is why I don’t want to let a player be a Deva in our upcoming game. They are these immortal beings and everyone else are fledgling adventurers.

Plus I don’t think he’ll have any idea how to role play that race, but that’s ok a completely different note (a few of my players don’t role play very well).

Have you considered looking at Aasimar’s?  That’s what “Devas” were called up until 4th Edition.  It’s a different spin on the idea, removing the “immortal” part and turning them into “mortal incarnations of celestials.”

So I see various posts about looking for folks to play D&D with.  I also see posts about folks looking for safe spaces for LGBTQ people.  Wouldn’t it be cool if there was both?

Well, if you live in the Washington, DC area, THERE IS!

If you’re interested, check out the Greater DC LGBTQ D&D Society.

Dungeons & Dragons Has Caught Up with Third-Wave Feminism

wellingtoncitylibraries:

Roleplaying games have long had a reputation as very male-dominated, but the latest edition of Dungeons & Dragons has made some serious efforts to be as inclusionary as possible. It’s a really cool article, and what they - the D&D authors - have done is pretty ground-breaking! Read it, even if you don’t even know what I am talking about.

We have D&D in the library, along with several other RPGs

<ednawelthorpe

While the article paints a slightly rosier picture of the state of the RPG community, as well as singles out D&D for praise while ignoring more progressive bastions such as Paizo, it’s still a very encouraging read.

On the subject of the RPG community.

slimnoid:

People like Zak S. and John Tarnowski/RPGpundit are horrible, toxic cancers on the hobby as a whole. Their attempts at gatekeeping is more destructive than any “story-gaming swine” conspiracy Tarnowski could ever cook up, and their rampant shaming and abuse towards those that disagree with them is horrendous.

Trying to get rid of them won’t work; they are too firmly rooted, and with their consultation work on D&D they will lord that over others like a kindergartner who just got a gold star from the teacher. By accepting their help, WotC and Mike Mearls are saying that it’s A-OKAY to act like a massive shitlord to those that play games you don’t like.

So what, then, can we do? Simple: we can do better. And the only way we can do better is by banding together and working towards a better, more inclusive, less toxic hobby. 

First: speak out against them, louder and more brilliantly than they can. Don’t stoop to their level and do personal attacks/stalking, or send others to do so on your behalf, but make it VERY CLEAR that the majority of roleplayers and hobbyists do not like these two or their ilk.

Two: Catalog every instance of their shit. Evidence will mount very quickly of their misdeeds, and it will become difficult if not impossible to dismiss their behavior and their antics when there’s a laundry list of their abuse.

Third: Point newcomers AWAY from them and their products, and towards better, more inclusive games, made by people who care about the hobby and the games it produces.

Fourth: Foster a better community through positive outlooks and friendly, inviting people and fantastic games. We can’t fix the broken people who poison the hobby, but what we can do is make a new generation of players who will be better than the last. Who won’t devolve into personal attacks and creating hate campaigns over games they don’t personally like. And who will teach the next generation after them the values they learned from us.

Remember: silence is acceptance. Don’t let them rule over us and warp people to their twisted outlook. We can be better than that. We are better than that.